Game of Thrones, Season 6, Television

Season 6, Episode 9: Battle of the Bastards

otIn a glorious triumph of cinematic television, “Battle of the Bastards” gave us a rare victory for the “good guys”—the Starks and, for the time being, Daenerys Targaryen. While the audience has a clear rooting interest in the Starks, Daenerys is more of a wild card these days. For now, we can applaud her victory. However, I wonder if by the end of the series this is the moment we look back on to mark the start of a tyrant’s campaign to brutally conquer the Seven Kingdoms. Only time will tell if Tyrion can continue to smooth out her fire-and-brimstone, “return their cities to the dirt” edges.

In the eponymous battle, the Starks unseat the nasty Boltons and reclaim supremacy in the North. Before he is mauled by his own dogs, Sansa reminds Ramsay, “Your house will disappear. Your name will disappear. All memory of you will disappear.” Will Daenerys be delivering that same speech to Sansa in a season or two? What will conquering the Seven Kingdoms look like for the dragon queen? Tyrion looks horrified when she promises to raze cities in Slaver’s Bay and unsure when she grants the Greyjoys their independence. It felt so great to see the Stark banners unfurled over the walls of Winterfell once again, but how long can these fleeting moments of triumph last with dragons looming on the horizon?

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Game of Thrones, Season 5, Television

Season 5, Episode 8: Hardhome

The title Game of Thrones is clever trick: while providing the bulk of the story, the wars for the Iron Throne are merely sideshows to the real war about to be waged between the living and the dead. In “Hardhome,” the war has finally begun, and boy was it a spectacular hour of television.

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Game of Thrones, Season 5, Television

Season 5, Episode 5: Kill the Boy

Growing up can be tough. Young adults crave independence and control, but rarely have the skills they need to claim it. Game of Thrones is, among many things, a tale of coming of age. Many of the characters start as children or adolescents, but there is little room in this world for the innocence of youth.

For most, childhood is wrested from them suddenly. Sansa and Arya witness the beheading of their father and then live through the eventual murder of their entire family. Daenerys’s late brother, Viserys, sells her in marriage to Khal Drogo in exchange for an army. Jon Snow, feeling like an outsider, impulsively joins up with one of the biggest bands of outcasts in Westeros, the Night’s Watch, pledging himself for life to an ascetic military order.

All of these young people have struggled, to varying degrees of success, to learn the tools that they need to survive in the adult world they were thrust into.

This season has proven to be a reckoning for the children who remain: as Maester Aemon tells Jon Snow, it is time to “kill the boy and let the man be born.” A few episodes ago, Arya had to cast off the symbols of her childhood in order to enter the House of Black and White. This week, “Kill the Boy” furthers the coming of age theme when Jon Snow takes a controversial, but critical stand as Lord Commander. Sansa, embedded deep in enemy territory, works in more subtle ways to stop being a “bystander to tragedy” and avenge her family. And across the Narrow Sea, Daenerys sheds some youthful naivety and shows her strength as queen.

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